Quran.

Quran’s prophecy of Covid-19

Sep 8, 2020

By Richard Dawkins

“There are verses about corona in the Quran.” This was the e-mail I just received from a Muslim zealot. He didn’t name the prophetic verses themselves so I did a bit of Googling and came up with a learned article written by a Muslim “scholar”1:

http://muslimmirror.com/eng/probable-mention-of-a-covid-19-like-pandemic-in-the-quran/

I read it and was bowled over. Admiring as I already was of the Quran’s prescience in foretelling the detailed facts of embryology (the embryo looks like a leech) nothing could have prepared me for the uncanny accuracy with which it foresaw Covid-19. Chapter 74 especially blew me away.

Verse 30 is translated as “Upon her nineteen.” What could be clearer? Nineteen! It’s an obvious reference to Covid-19.

Verse 8 contains two words derived from the same root “quarn”, which is authoritatively regarded (by leading “scholars”) as referring to the end-time trumpet. “Quarana”, an older version of “quarn”, means “horn” and that is very significant. The Covid-19 virus is now known to be a spherical particle with “projections”. Projections! Obviously those projections could be none other than the “horns” mentioned in verse 8.

Finally, most convincing of all, “quarana” is rather like the English word “corona”2. Bingo! QED! Mission accomplished! Allah be praised!

 


  1. A real scholar has read more than one book.
  2. And what about “quarantine”, though the “scholar” somehow managed to miss the point.

12 comments on “Quran’s prophecy of Covid-19

  • So, Allah was going to protect Muslim countries! What happened? Did God want to punish Iranian Muslims, if so why? 
    The world needs more people like Richard Dawkins, people who are willing to speak out and challenge superstitions and tom foolery. 
    Today more than ever we need to mull a dictum attributed to Edmund Burke:
    The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.

      


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  • If Allah went to such lengths to hide a hint of a virulent pandemic that would happen a thousand years in the future then why didn’t he also hide the cure as well? He could’ve transmitted the verse in archaic classical Arabic, understandable only to Islamic scholars. Now we have a bunch of myopic fanatics who have twisted their brains into pretzels trying to extract meaning where none exists. It’s like dumping a bushel of apples into a press and watching one measly drop of juice drop out the other end.

    It’s a complete waste of time running people through this exercise when our best minds need to be out there doing their best to help others through the medical crisis and not inspecting every letter and punctuation in a dusty old tome that should’ve been fed to the camels many centuries ago.


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  • I read the original article, the key words of his debate were ”qarna” & ”quruna”, but in fact the correct spelling of those two words are ”qarn” & ”qurun” without the letter A at the end. Which was deliberately added to make his point.


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  • It does not seem to me to be a good approach to solve the world’s problems by making fun of people who are less fortunate than you to have received a good education. It is not their fault. If  you were born in the in the right part of the Middle East you might have constructed the same kind of beliefs for yourself as the people you are poking fun at. I don’t think it does any good to make statements like, “..should’ve been fed to the camels many centuries ago.” You know I am sure many of people in the Middle East if they lived in the West would continue to indulge in satisfying the oil companies and not make the change to clean alternative energy like hydrogen extracted from water that as a fuel, only has water vapor as its by product which precipitates and rains back on the Earth, but at least “stuck with camels” their ecological footprint is less than that of many people over here. I think the best thing to do is for us to work towards a world where everyone there and here can have a life where they receive a good education, and decent life, so they don’t have to build a world view from the only written words available to them. Consider yourself fortunate and use your good situation to help make a world with a reasonable future for all of humanity. The Dawkin’s Foundation does work towards this, with healthy clear thinking, and making available healthy, reasonable  ideas and knowledge, as well as pointing out misleading lines of reason but I I think it would only be best for everyone if we adhered to that path always with understaning.


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  • “clean alternative energy like hydrogen extracted from water that as a fuel, only has water vapor as its by product which precipitates and rains back on the Earth”

    Hydrogen extracted from water is by no means a clean alternative energy yet, and will not be until it can be produced in abundance with renewable energy having low carbon footprint and low environmental harm. Currently most hydrogen is produced from fossil fuels. Electrolytically produced hydrogen is energy intensive with a net loss in energy density at the final stage. From Wikipedia: “current best processes for water electrolysis have an effective electrical efficiency of 70-80%, so that producing 1 kg of hydrogen (which has a specific energy of 143 MJ/kg or about 40 kWh/kg) requires 50–55 kWh of electricity” That’s electrical efficiency, and there are the further inevitable energy losses intrinsic in electricity production from fossil and nuclear fuels. Hydrogen presently has a huge carbon footprint.
    I read the Koran, and it did not make much sense. In my opinion, if there were a god, it would not fail to communicate to such a profound degree.


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  • Well about ten years ago I read in Yahoo news they made extraction of hydrogen from water efficient, but even if they didn’t, there are many alternatives to this fossil fuels that have put far above the safe limits of CO2 into the atmosphere. Just the other night my brother was telling me as an agricultural scientist for the USDA who was sent as part of his work to the plant  where they manufacture this catalyst through which they pass the water to separate hydrogen from it, practically, that he knows of companies in Japan who have been using it  for several years now to produce electricity.


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  • In fact I was telling my brother just the other night how frustrated I felt over global warming and how I read hydrogen extracting was feasible several years back, he said write you congress people and I was like well you know I don’t think they really read these letters. And he was like when he worked in Washington working with senators on agricultural policies, they often told him they listen to letters more than anything, more than petitions and editorials. So said okay I will write them and he said he would give me the links to literature on how this was now feasible, some of it in popular engineering magazines. So I think I will get the links to those articles, and not only write my senator, but post them here at RDF.


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  • Ian Beardsley says:

    my brother was telling me as an agricultural scientist for the USDA who was sent as part of his work to the plant  where they manufacture this catalyst through which they pass the water to separate hydrogen from it,

    There is this system for using solar thermal energy to produce hydrogen without fossil fuels.

    https://scitechdaily.com/engineers-develop-water-splitting-solar-thermal-system-to-produce-hydrogen-fuel/

    A laboratory model of a multi-tube solar reactor at the University of Colorado Boulder that can be used to split water in order to produce clean hydrogen fuel. – Photo courtesy University of Colorado Boulder
    Engineers from the University of Colorado Boulder have devised a solar-thermal system that can be used to split water in order to produce clean hydrogen fuel.



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  • It’s probably a matter of scale right now. The technologies are available and in development, but only a tiny fraction of the hydrogen needed is being produced efficiently.


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  • Ian Beardsley #5
     
    You have characterized me as a mean, intellectually condescending, ethnocentric camel hater. I reject your accusation.
     
    The only insults that I hurled in comment number 3 were directed toward myopic fanatics and a dusty old tome. So my wrath is directed straight at fundamentalists and the Koran. You seem to be ruffled up over this situation.
     
    Since the Koran is just a book, a bunch of paper pages and some ink, what is the problem with insulting it? Books are not protected under the Universal Declaration of human rights and by no ethical obligation either. Books have no rights and we have every right and obligation to critique the ideas put forth in books (and every other media).
     
    If you would like to defend the Koran and the ideas it presents then by all means you should proceed with that. It’s a discussion that takes place on this site on a regular basis and I welcome that. If on the other hand you are asking me to not hurt the feelings of Muslims by criticizing their sacred text then you’re asking too much. The ideas in the Koran cause harm to the great majority of the 1.8 billion Muslims in this world and to plenty of others who are not members of that religion but who suffer harm from it anyways.
     
    It does not seem to me to be a good approach to solve the world’s problems by making fun of people who are less fortunate than you to have received a good education. It is not their fault.
     
    I agree that it’s not their fault. I hope you’re aware of the policy of fundamentalist Muslims that keeps girls and women out of formal education. This has been a difficult struggle and is ongoing in locations where fundamentalists hold control.  It’s one of the first things they do when they move into a territory – send the girls home from school permanently. It is the fundamentalists doing this, not the common moderates! There’s a big difference! Please understand this difference. I am criticizing the reactionaries here, not the moderates who generally are in favor of progress as long as it is incremental. I’ll also mention that not all fundamentalists are illiterate or undereducated. They have that bunch but plenty of fundamentalists are decently educated and some are very well educated so it would be best not to make assumptions on that. I can’t believe you think I’m “making fun” of people less fortunate than I am.
     
     If  you were born in the in the right part of the Middle East you might have constructed the same kind of beliefs for yourself as the people you are poking fun at.
     
    If I had been born in the Middle East I’d have probably been indoctrinated into the religion of Islam just like most people have been who were born there. Maybe I would’ve remained devout and maybe not, who knows? But no, I was born in New England, was indoctrinated into the Methodist church and left it as a teen because I considered the theology to be bullshit. But so what? How does all of this limit my opinion of fundamentalists and sacred texts? I can’t criticize anyone because they were indoctrinated and now they can’t think their way out of a paper bag? Maybe I’m doing them a favor by presenting an alternative way of seeing a ridiculous dogmatic statement.
     
    I’ll tell you something Ian, if you’re supporting unethical ideas just because you don’t want to hurt someone’s feelings then you’re enabling some serious cruelty. I hope you won’t do that. If you don’t have the cojones to stand up for what’s right and good then stay out of the way of others who do.

    I don’t think it does any good to make statements like, “..should’ve been fed to the camels many centuries ago.” 
     
    If someone had tossed the original Koran to the camels then the world would be a better place today. The Bible is in the same category.
     
    but at least “stuck with camels” their ecological footprint is less than…
     
    Why are there quotes around “stuck with camels”? I never said that. You said it, let’s make that clear. Camels are a perfectly respectable species and I have no problem with them at all. They are not gastronomically discriminating creatures and would make a meal of any dastardly sacred text that comes to their attention, by the way. The use of camels must keep the ecological footprint smaller but unfortunately, in the countries where camels are still beasts of burden, there is a general lack of environmental resource management and the pollution, sewage management and trash and garbage in the streets is intolerable. A few camels don’t even begin to balance it out.
     
    I think the best thing to do is for us to work towards a world where everyone there and here can have a life where they receive a good education, and decent life, so they don’t have to build a world view from the only written words available to them.
     
    Excellent Ian! And exactly how would that happen as long as fundamentalists have the upper hand?! None of that is on the list of goals of Muslim fundamentalists. Those goals are attainable only in a secular society built on respect for every individual and with an ethical humanist worldview.
     
    Consider yourself fortunate and use your good situation to help make a world with a reasonable future for all of humanity. 
     
    WTF. You don’t even know me. How have I been managing to stay alive without your advice on proper thinking and living?!
     
    I think it would only be best for everyone if we adhered to that path always with understaning.

     
    Do you even live in the real world? Read the Koran and have a conversation on this topic with a fundamentalist. Then you’ll have an inkling of what we’re up against here, Mr. Pangloss.


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  • on an almost daily basis i meet abul on my walks

    when he is going to or coming from the local sunni mosque

    he’s a devout bangladeshi muslim immigrant to canada

    we get on well   very friendly terms

    but if we talk religion it’s a bit of a minefield

    he often talks about he/him    pointing upwards

    at the all-knowing  all-powerful one

    one day i said   why him? why not her?

    at first he said   there is no her

    now he says   there is no her or him just allah

    progress?


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