Humans Will Never Live on Another Planet, Nobel Laureate Says. Here’s Why.
Oct 14, 2019

By Yasemin Saplakoglu Here’s the reality: We’re messing up the Earth and any far-out ideas of colonizing another orb when we’re done with our own are wishful thinking. That’s according to Michel Mayor, an astrophysicist who was a co-recipient of the Nobel Prize in physics this year for discovering the first planet orbiting a sun-like star outside …

Mini Gravitational-Wave Detector Could Probe Dark Matter
Oct 11, 2019

By Jeremy Hsu Within one second of the big bang, the first newborn black holes may have announced their formation with gravitational waves that stretched and squeezed the fabric of existence as they rippled outward into the expanding universe. Now researchers at Northwestern University have begun planning a tabletop-size sensor that could detect these primordial …

Giant sauropod dinosaurs may have sported turtlelike beaks
Oct 10, 2019

By John Pickrell Typically taller than four elephants and heftier than a jet airliner, sauropods are among the most famous of the dinosaurs. But scientists may have been wrong about one of their key features. Instead of lizardlike lips, the behemoths sported beaks akin to those of birds or turtles, researchers report here today at …

Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries
Oct 10, 2019

By Ben Guarino The Nobel Prize in chemistry was awarded Wednesday to John B. Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino for the development of lithium-ion batteries. “We have gained access to a technical revolution,” said Sara Snogerup Linse, a chemistry professor and member of the award committee, sweeping her finger at the reporters gathered …

With 20 new moons, Saturn now has the most of any solar system planet
Oct 9, 2019

By Sofie Bates Saturn now reigns as the solar system’s “moon king,” thanks to 20 newfound moons. That brings the ringed planet’s total known satellites to 82, knocking Jupiter — with 79 moons (SN: 7/17/18) — off the throne, the International Astronomical Union’s Minor Planet Center announced October 7. And it’s not just a phase. Saturn is …

As Sea Levels Rise, So Do Ghost Forests
Oct 8, 2019

By Moises Velasquez-Manoff Up and down the mid-Atlantic coast,sea levels are rising rapidly, creating stands of dead trees — often bleached, sometimes blackened — known as ghost forests. The water is gaining as much as 5 millimeters per year in some places, well above the global average of 3.1 millimeters, driven by profound environmental shifts …

3 Scientists Win Nobel Prize In Physics For Work On Earth’s Place In The Universe
Oct 8, 2019

By Scott Neuman A Canadian and two Swiss scientists have won the Nobel Prize in physics for contributions to our understanding of the evolution of the universe and Earth’s position in the cosmos. James Peebles of Princeton received half of the prize, with Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz sharing the other half, the Royal Swedish …

Not long ago, the center of the Milky Way exploded
Oct 7, 2019

By ASTRO 3D A titanic, expanding beam of energy sprang from close to the supermassive black hole in the centre of the Milky Way just 3.5 million years ago, sending a cone-shaped burst of radiation through both poles of the Galaxy and out into deep space. That’s the finding arising from research conducted by a …

Nobel Prize in Medicine Awarded to 3 for Work on Cells and Oxygen
Oct 7, 2019

By Gina Kolata and Megan Specia The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was jointly awarded to three scientists — William G. Kaelin Jr., Peter J. Ratcliffe and Gregg L. Semenza — for their work on how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability. The Nobel Assembly announced the prize at the Karolinska Institute in …

Astronomers Find Our Second Interstellar Visitor Looks like the Locals
Oct 4, 2019

By Jonathan O’Callaghan Last month astronomers were thrilled by the confirmation that a second known interstellar object is flying through our solar system. Named 2I/Borisov—after its discoverer, Crimean amateur astronomer Gennady Borisov—it has already attracted huge attention. Countless observatories, from the Very Large Telescope in Chile to NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, are studying the object, and plenty …

These Butterflies Evolved to Eat Poison. How Could That Have Happened?
Oct 3, 2019 · 1 

By Carl Zimmer Monarch butterflies eat only milkweed, a poisonous plant that should kill them. The butterflies thrive on it, even storing milkweed toxins in their bodies as a defense against hungry birds. For decades, scientists have marveled at this adaptation. On Thursday, a team of researchers announced they had pinpointed the key evolutionary steps …

No, Vitamin C won’t cure your cold
Oct 3, 2019

By Madeline Marshall Many people reach straight for the orange juice when they start to get a cold. Or pick up a Vitamin C supplement that claims to boost your immune system. But studies have shown that Vitamin C can’t actually cure your cold. At most, taking 1,000 mg of Vitamin C regularly could reduce …