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  • By Maajid Nawaz

    Something great is afoot in Tunisia. Having sparked the consecutive Arab uprisings that began over five years ago across the entire Middle East, the country is now proving itself a pioneer […]

    • In other words Ennahda, Tunisia’s version of the Muslim Brotherhood, just approved an internal reform that acknowledged the primacy of secular democracy over Islamist theocracy.

      Amid all the dictatorships and destruction, the turmoil and turbulence, the extremism and extermination, finally some good news from the bitter politics of the Arab world.

      “Some good news” is a bit of an understatement here! This is earth shaking news, especially when we see countries like Turkey sliding back into theocracy.

    • a jubilant conference….

      and

      I recall insisting that his Ennahda version of Islam was simply not revolutionary enough. But time changes us all. And as the Arab uprisings have shown us, it is evolution not revolution that is best placed to settle the political disputes of the wider Middle East. It was, after all, my own slow political evolution that brought me to these very views today.

    • Well, well, well; this is a turn-up for the books and no mistake gov’nor.

      The Brotherhood have been a pain in the humanitie’s butt since the days of Gamil Abdul Nasser.

      Could this be the removal of the first brick in the demolition of the wall of unreason? Or, to extend the metaphor, the laying of the first foundation stone of a house of love and reason?

      We’ll have to wait and see.

      In any case, that second option would be a fitting memorial to “The Greatest” Muslim of all, who died today; AKA, the Louisville Lip.

    • Stafford Gordon #4
      Jun 4, 2016 at 1:47 pm

      Could this be the removal of the first brick in the demolition of the wall of unreason? Or, to extend the metaphor, the laying of the first foundation stone of a house of love and reason?

      Sceptics might think, it could be a ploy to gain power through democracy, before reverting to type. (I’m watching Turkey.)

    • I’m quite certain that the Brexit and Remain proponents would bring in God on their sides if they thought it would win votes. Luckily that hasn’t happened so far in the EU referendum in Britain. Instead of “Hitler”, the first one to mention “God”, is bound to lose ! All power to those parts of humanity throwing off the shackles of religion !

    • Flossie.
      Maybe that’s the way it’s written in ‘American’ as opposed to English?
      😉

      However it’s written, looks like good news to me. Just bit worried things are taking a turn for the worse in Turkey.

    • Alan4 @ # 5.

      “Sceptics might think, it could be a ploy to gain power through democracy, before reverting to type. (I’m watching Turkey.)”

      Moi aussi!

    • Alan #5

      it could be a ploy to gain power through democracy, before reverting to type….Turkey

      Politically these situations are quite different in their roots. Erdogan is a corrupt secularist solving his problems of concealing corruption and seeing off religious rivals by moving in theocratic ways. The new found religiosity buys him a new set of allies and a new badge of morality. His manipulations to augment the powers of the president to to continue to silence the cyber media and its release of incriminating telephone recordings and adverse comment may carry him to a spurious sultanate position but the driver is all criminal/political, I’ll wager.

    • This has developed a little from two and a half years ago, Olgun. From what I can see the evidence against Erdogan (and for instance his son) is solid and in the public domain, hence the ISP intimidation whilst that against Gulen has not been made public. If there were any, Twitter and Facebook would be Erdogan’s friend.

      My point, Ollie, is that this Turkish backslide from secularism is very unlikely to be an Islamist conspiracy, it will probably be rather more to serve the political needs of a compromised politician. Losing political power will make him much more judicially accessible, I propose.

    • Pinball1970 #2
      Jun 4, 2016 at 3:19 am

      Glass half full today Laurie

      Yes, indeed it is.

      If this holds true then I’m so happy for the Tunisians. In years past that country was relatively liberal and secular. They’ve had more than a decade to watch what happened in Algeria on their western border as the fundamentalists waged war on the secular moderates there. Both Morocco and Tunisia were hanging onto their hats as Algeria sorted out their internal disaster. With Algeria on one side and the Libyan disaster on the other side, hopefully Tunisia can pull out of this with some stability and recovery.

    • appreciated, OLgun.

    • I didn’t realise Sharia Law had sections on aviation.

    • No, just seems to be business failings. Nothing to do with the Sharia angle. Must be hard getting a new airline off the ground, so to speak.

    • OHooligan #18
      Jun 14, 2016 at 3:07 pm

      No, just seems to be business failings. Nothing to do with the Sharia angle. Must be hard getting a new airline off the ground, so to speak.

      Not sure about that!
      Management failings on safety regulations and financial propriety, but with full Sharia compliance, suggests the priorities and emphasis were in the wrong place!

      @link -The DCA said it had conducted a “thorough deliberation” on the airline’s response to the safety audit.

      A failed response to an official safety audit after failing to follow regulations, suggests that those involved just did not have the grasp of the methodology needed or the motivation to apply themselves to the task. –
      ie. The wrong mind-set and wrong skill-set! – Probably related to “faith-thinking”.

    • OHooligan #17
      Jun 14, 2016 at 3:03 pm

      I didn’t realise Sharia Law had sections on aviation.

      The nearest thing I have seen to this in the UK, is LEA. consultative committees on school policies, where Catholic schools with governing bodies chaired by priests, were found (in their absence), to be operating from illegal policy documents they had written themselves, having sent no representatives to the training sessions, and no representatives to the consultation meetings on compliance with changes in the laws over the last few years.
      {Knowing what is administratively right or wrong by “faith”, apparently can save lots of time bothering to read legal documents or listening to expert advice! (allegedly)}

    • Having the Sharia requirement first and foremost, I suppose it wasn’t so easy to recruit the best and brightest in the airline industry. Cabin crew perhaps, but pilots, engineers, maintenance technicians, administrators, managers? Or maybe the pay was crap. I saw mention of pilots striking, was that over pay or overwork, which would likely have clashed with safety regulations? Or was it directly a safety issue, striking due to the airline failing to comply with regulations, and the pilots noticed and refused to fly? (In which case, I applaud them.)