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  • By Nicholas St. Fleur
    Stargazers from around the globe gathered at the Grand Canyon this week to gander upon our galaxy’s grandeur. The national park is hosting its annual star party, an eight-night event i […]

    • @OP – Stargazers from around the globe gathered at the Grand Canyon this week to gander upon our galaxy’s grandeur. The national park is hosting its annual star party, an eight-night event inviting the public to observe the heavens free from blinding city lights and street lamps.

      In the modern world many people have to get into remote valleys screened by mountains on cloudless nights, in order to see the vast numbers of stars in the sky.
      City dwellers only see a few of the brightest ones and often miss meteorite showers as well.

      Many have never seen the huge band of stars sweeping across the sky, showing an edge-on view of our Milky-way galaxy!

    • The Australian Outback in vast and uninhabited. The Southern Hemisphere has a slightly better view of the Milky Way. On a moonless night, lying in your swag (Australian bush sleeping bag) the Milky Way fairly blazes across the sky. A stunning sight.

    • Davd #2

      Lucky bastard.

      North London. I think I’ve seen the moon a couple of times…

      Actually the latest street lighting has much less spill due to physically smaller light sources and more accurate optics and in peripheral towns street lights are often being turned off after midnight. The change is profound.