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  • By Matt Payton

    Thousands of people have left the Church of Denmark following a nationwide advertising campaign by the country’s atheist society.

    Between April and June, 10,000 people left the church – the h […]

    • It looks like the pitch was “the church is taking your money and not giving you anything in return. You might as well cut the cord.” It is like cancelling a gym membership you never use. These people may still believe in god.

      Germany also has a scheme for the government to collect tithes.

      In the USA the churches get privilege in the form of tax-free property, income, and secret books.

      This should be unconstitutional. Tax-freedom is surely the government promoting a religion. They are enjoying government services without paying for them.

    • Roedy #1
      Sep 11, 2016 at 12:05 am

      You might as well cut the cord.” It is like cancelling a gym membership you never use. These people may still believe in god.

      Germany also has a scheme for the government to collect tithes.

      Of course Europe has political parties with open religious associations – such as The Christian Democrats.

      Having said that, there is no good reason why governments should be collecting tithes for churches in the modern age of direct debits and standing orders, which people use for subscriptions to other organisations!

    • Christianity has little left to tempt people into the pews in most of Northern Europe. Even a pickled herring is more sexy than a Christian sermon. And then there’s the football, movies, rock music, soaps, and all the other more modern ‘opiates’.

    • Doesn’t this have more to do with withdrawing financial support from a state-sponsored religious institution than ceasing either religious observance or personal religious belief? I visited Denmark in 2004; I was Christian clergy at that time. My wife and I visited several churches around the country and attended Sunday services at one, in Copenhagen. My impression was that Danes, while not particularly religious in the sense of belief, value church in times of life transition, like marriage and death. And I felt that the state church kept the fundamentalist undergrowth down! As I understand and briefly experienced, the Danish state church has been – with a mild Lutheran flavor added – essentially a Humanist institution since the time of their great liberal theologian NFS Grundtvig.

    • Thousands of people have left the Church of Denmark following a
      nationwide advertising campaign by the country’s atheist society.

      I wish a similar occurrence would happen in the US!

    • @ # 8

      Kickstart a Campaign.

    • @#5 – A few years back, the Church of Scotland considered the issue of formally turning religious observance into “times of reflection” – one reason for this was that some were concerned parents might withdraw their children because they misunderstood the nature of the events.

      The common practice is to hold what are, in effect, times for reflection – designed to be inclusive of children from all faiths and none.
      They do not take the form of worship.

      The faith-head politicians obviously thought that one through in designing this fudged collective activity! 🙂

      Muslims on prayer mats facing Mecca in one corner, Catholics crossing themselves in another, and atheists trying to reflect rationally the coming day in between!