Mario Gruber


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    • Re: fatal dose of homeopathic sleeping pills.
      According to homeopathic woo, eating a fistful of sleeping pills should be perfectly safe. To kill yourself, you must dissolve a pill in water, then dilute it 100 to 1 and drink a teaspoon.

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    • 3D Printed heart muscle are amaze-balls! As my students are wont to say.

    • DNA data offer evidence of unknown extinct human

      .GENETIC HEIRLOOMS People from Papua New Guinea (shown) and Australia carry small amounts of DNA from extinct human relatives.
      New research suggests that the DNA may not come from Neandertals or Denisovans, but from a third, previously unknown extinct hominid.

      Fascinating! Yet another remote ancestor – species or subspecies!

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    • Baby And Dog Laying In Grass Together

      Most informative picture caption ever…

    • Mission complete: Rosetta’s journey ends in daring descent

      The first few final close-up pictures of the comet are showing fine detail which has never before been seen on a comet.
      As more images and data are processed, the quality of the information from this last move is becoming clear, and well worth the loss of a probe which was fading away as the weakening sunlight of the outer Solar-System, gradually shut down its electricity generating capacity and signal strength.

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    • @OP – China begins operating world’s largest radio telescope

      China is pressing on with becoming the world leader in scientific and technical research, while others dither and prevaricate, with brainless science-denying politicians, obstructing and fatalistically prevaricating!

    • Roedy replied 4 years ago

      I remember when I was a kid, people laughed at Japan as incapable of manufacturing anything but junk. But they ended up making better quality cameras and cars. Today that is a given. The same could happen with China.

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    • bonnie2 #1
      Sep 6, 2016 at 7:16 am

      could there be any credence to the idea that a drone might be responsible for the Space X disaster.

      I don’t think so.
      It was a static test firing, so ignition of some sort of fuel leak looks most likely.

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    • Every Sunday I look forward to this. I never got that from church.

    • @OP – link – Pale Red Dot campaign reveals Earth-mass world in orbit around Proxima Centauri

      It should be remembered, that only a very small percentage of Earth-mass exoplanets are likely to be Earth-Type planets!

      Although Proxima b orbits much closer to its star than Mercury does to the Sun in the Solar System, the star itself is far fainter than the Sun. As a result Proxima b lies well within the habitable zone around the star and has an estimated surface temperature that would allow the presence of liquid water.

      However, the temperature could vary according to the nature and composition of any atmosphere on the planet.

      Despite the temperate orbit of Proxima b, the conditions on the surface may be strongly affected by the ultraviolet and X-ray flares from the star — far more intense than the Earth experiences from the Sun [4].

      Red Dwarf Stars are very prone to massive flares giving off radiation which is damaging to life.

      Two separate papers discuss the habitability of Proxima b and its climate. They find that the existence of liquid water on the planet today cannot be ruled out

      “Cannot be ruled out”, is far from confirming actual presence.

      and, in such case, it may be present over the surface of the planet only in the sunniest regions,

      With a very dim Red Dwarf parent star, much of the planet will be very cold. – Especially the dark side!

      either in an area in the hemisphere of the planet facing the star (synchronous rotation) or in a tropical belt (3:2 resonance rotation).

      The likely synchronous rotation, keeping one face towards the star (as with one side of our Moon facing Earth), there is likely to be a massive contrast in the temperatures between the daylight star-facing side, and the dark side.

      Proxima b’s rotation, the strong radiation from its star and the formation history of the planet makes its climate quite different from that of the Earth, and it is unlikely that Proxima b has seasons.

      Its synchronicity and very short year (of only a few Earth-days), would give a quite weird climate!

    • @OP – link – Pale Red Dot campaign reveals Earth-mass world in orbit around Proxima Centauri

      It is however promising, that exoplanets are being found in this close a proximity to Earth!

    • I look forward to this as well DWH but only read a couple today and space the rest throughout the week because as much “stuff” as there is on net, good content can be scarce.

      One I read tonight was the fish oil piece, hoping it held the answer to safely increasing my bacon intake. In a way it did but in this world of unintended consequences, I have to wonder what my tolerance to mercury might be.

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    • @OP – 400-year-old Greenland shark ‘longest-living vertebrate’

      Many of the Arctic and Antarctic marine species live life metabolically VERY slowly in near freezing temperatures.

    • I thought the Magrathean Sperm Whale picture was very good.

      The Greenland Shark story it linked to was amazing.

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    • I love coincidences, but the problem is that people read things into them in an attempt to give the impression that they know something no one else does, or that they are very perceptive and deep; a bit like religion really.

      Daniel Dennett coined a word for it: a deepity.

      A statement that to the extent it’s true, it doesn’t matter. And to the extent it matters, it isn’t true.

    • David Hume’s the man!

    • http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-36961433

      China’s elevated bus: Futuristic ‘straddling bus’ hits the road

      This could be an excellent solution to city traffic congestion, and used in conjunction with electric cars, provide a clean air environment in addition to an economical public transport system.

      I put a link to this last week on another RDFS discussion of green issues.

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    • The new lithium battery could greatly bring down the cost and weight of electric cars. It could also mean a long-range light-weight electric bike. It could also mean a safe battery for laptops.

    • @link – England’s plastic bag usage drops 85% since 5p charge introduced

      Number of single-use bags handed out dropped to 500m in first six months since charge, compared with 7bn the previous year

      As usual newspaper editors manage to get the headline wrong!

      England’s plastic bag USAGE has not reduced! England’s plastic bag WASTAGE has dropped 85% while plastic bag re-usage has increased!

      When shopping, I usually carry a light so-called “single-use” bag in my jeans pocket for use multiple times, and have some heavier re-usable bags in the car door-pocket for larger grocery loads.
      These are returned there after use ready for next time.

      It’s not rocket science!

    • @bonnie2 #4

      Some very smart people have way too much time on their hands.

      (I mean that in an admiring, slightly envious, sort of way. )

    • The CO2 + sunlight = fuel story looks perhaps too good to be true.

      “The ability to turn (atmospheric) CO2 into fuel at a cost comparable to a gallon of gasoline would render fossil fuels obsolete.”

      Now, wouldn’t THAT be a game-changer?

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    • If as the PR blurb says, that dementia will soon be preventable, where on earth will we be able to get contributors for this website?

    • eejit #2
      Jul 18, 2016 at 3:47 pm

      If as the PR blurb says, that dementia will soon be preventable, where on earth will we be able to get contributors for this website?

      I don’t know about occasional visitors to this site, but think of the impact on the Vatican!!!

    • Good one Alan!

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    • Newly-Discovered Planet Has 3 Suns

      @ link – “For about half of the planet’s orbit, which lasts 550 Earth-years, three stars are visible in the sky, the fainter two always much closer together, and changing in apparent separation from the brightest star throughout the year,” said Kevin Wagner, a doctoral student in Apai’s research group and the paper’s first author, who discovered HD 131399Ab. “For much of the planet’s year the stars appear close together, giving it a familiar night-side and day-side with a unique triple-sunset and sunrise each day. As the planet orbits and the stars grow farther apart each day, they reach a point where the setting of one coincides with the rising of the other – at which point the planet is in near-constant daytime for about one-quarter of its orbit, or roughly 140 Earth-years.”

      This is an interesting widely spaced solar-system structure, with a large planet distantly orbiting the large “central” star in a centuries long orbit, and what are in effect two smaller binary stars closely orbiting each other, with the pair of stars orbiting the central star at an even greater distance than the planet, way outside the orbit of the planet HD 131399Ab.

      This observation, helps to improve the understanding, that there are diverse forms of planetary systems.

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    • Scientists have found preliminary evidence that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other compounds found in marijuana can promote the cellular removal of amyloid beta, a toxic protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

      Sweet. Just in time for we aging hippies.

      Its a pity the stuff makes me paranoid and needs to be avoided…. I had to be sent home early in a cab from a typical Islington dinner party after I unwittingly had the brownies. I insisted my bum was on fire and that I needed to sit in a bath or I could be reduced to a pile of ash.

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    • I must say spot mini is scarey as all whatsit. The blandness of the actions in a domestic setting make it worse.

      It clearly needs some rubber foot ware.

      Awesome though.

    • This is awesome too

      “The meta-analysis of 11 prospective observational studies demonstrates that each 1% increment of omega-3s in total fatty acids in blood may be associated with a 20% decrease in risk of all-cause mortality. This is an important finding for the potential contribution of adequate omega-3 intake to public health.”

    • Thanks for pointing that out, Phil. I’ve been taking 4-6 grams of fish oil for a few years now with an associated positive trend in my bloodwork (in the absence of any drugs of course) showing an increase in my HDL and a decrease in my LDL, triglycerides and total cholesterol. I also take niacin which could be responsible for the cholesterol control as well.

    • Dan! I believe our first real acquaintance here was via some supplement/nutrition article. You were a newbie then but you’re a seasoned vet now, posting far more than me, brava!

      Your diet as mentioned (clearly part of a much larger diet in terms of variety, or one would hope) sounds fine. Avocado’s are sources of healthy fat (fat itself is underrated as a macronutrient; the real villain was fat with an associated insulin spike from copious sugar/refined flour intake).

      Cucumbers are just fine, though unremarkable from a health standpoint. Water with lemon is good. Citric acid (in the lemon) is a natural kidney stone repellent. Of course exercise is paramount as well.

    • Dan, you are certainly not obese – in fact at 6’11” and 183 you are utterly rail thin bordering on anorexic! But I’m guessing you pecked at “1” one too many times. That said, 6’1″ 183 is not bad at all. I’m 6’2″ 240, but a good portion of that is legacy weightlifting weight (i.e., lean tissue).

      Thanks for the kind words. I read all of yours as well and I’m always happy to see them along with some of the other regulars. I envy you (and Phil and others) your philosophy interest as that’s never been my cup of tea.

      They certainly do seem like troubling times but I’m trying to think of a time when we collectively said it wasn’t. I think every generation thinks they have it the worst. Of course climate change skews that equation somewhat these days. But when I think of the gaudy casualties of WWII or even Vietnam in comparison with some of our more recent ill advised forays into conflict, I can’t help but think we’ve got some kind of historic amnesia when it comes to evaluating our own troubled times. That said, I can’t think of another time when one of the major political parties was in such disarray. When that party is putting forth such a clown candidate, truly an embarrassing joke of a candidate in pretty much every conceivable way, it is indeed a sign of trouble.

    • And by the way, moving forward, whenever you see these words “eats away at belly fat!” – you are sure to be in the midst of a room full of bullshit laden Dr. Oz acolytes. Or even just one.

      The likelihood that cucumbers (or celery, or raspberries, or tree bark of some kind) have some newly discovered “fat burning” compound that few but your friend (or Dr. Oz) have heard of is exceedingly unlikely. As a skeptic the next words out of your mouth should be “show me the studies”. And the studies should of course be peer reviewed and available on some respected resource such as PubMed (ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed).

    • Well done Dan. Reminds me a little of the starfish story from way back: I paraphrase:

      Young person walking on beach after a storm, finds lots of starfish washed up above the tide-line, for miles along that beach, takes to picking them up one by one and throwing them back into the waves. Another beach walker observes that there’s a vast number of them, and that throwing some back can’t make any difference. Young person picks up one more, and throws it, saying “it made a difference to that one”.

      Well, Dan, it seems you made a difference to that one. Once again, well done.

    • Bravo, Dan! That’s a nice story. Good luck to your ‘adopted’ pet.

      And in reference to your post script on the 30th, I do/take both. I like fish (salmon primarily) and eat it several times a week. I also take supplemental fish oil capsules. It’s hard to get the ideal amount of omega 3’s from fish alone. The amount I generally take (1.5 grams per day) is, as I mentioned, difficult to obtain from food alone. Remember, one average fish oil tablet (1 gram = 1,000 mgs) only provides ~ 300 mgs of omega 3’s per tablet. Hence it would take 5 tablets to get ~ 1,500 mgs. Flax tablets also supply omega 3’s but the source (ALA) has to be synthesized to the useable EPA/DHA form, which is not very efficient.

    • Good work, Dan.

  • Mario Gruber posted a new activity comment 4 years, 3 months ago

    There is wayyy more where this comes from – not just the latest science news compilations, but one place with the best popular science content on the web, everything about your favorite scientists and much more: http://bit.ly/UCProcks

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    • There is wayyy more where this comes from – not just the latest science news compilations, but one place with the best popular science content on the web, everything about your favorite scientists and much more: http://bit.ly/UCProcks

    • :OP link:- from the American eel (Anguilla rostrata), which slithers between ponds after it rains, to the longspined sea scorpion (Taurulus bubalis), an ornate looking coastal fish that hops out of tide pools when oxygen levels dip too low. And then there’s the Atlantic mudskipper (Periophthalmus barbarous), a fish with bulbous eyes and arm like fins that crawls around on mudflats to find food.

      Mudskippers can be observed climbing out of the water directly, or viewed via numerous video clips on the internet.

      From the comments on amphibious fish: –

      Ben Bache • 3 days ago

      And why have we never observed anything like it?

      Fundamentaists have never observed fish making the transition from sea to land, because their faith-blinkers blank out observations and scientific evidence.
      There is an abundance of evidence but it will never be seen by those who refuse to look for it, or look at it!

      At what point do people give up on the bogus, religion based evolution theory

      They then sit in denial, making laughable claims illustrating their profound ignorance of the evolutionary biology which has been established in reputable scientific studies, thousands of times during the last 150 years!

    • I was wondering how computer languages might evolve to properly exploit the 1000 cpu chip.
      In nearly all languages, loops presume sequential execution. We need a loop where each iteration is presumed to occur in parallel, with means to count and summarise. Files are presumed sequential. They need to be conceptualised and accessible as unordered collections of records. Perhaps computations will be unordered, then sorted for human display at the last second.

  • Mario Gruber posted a new activity comment 4 years, 3 months ago

    There is wayyy more where this comes from – not just the latest science news compilations, but one place with the best popular science content on the web, everything about your favorite scientists and much more: http://bit.ly/UCProcks

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